Voluntary evacuations in Kansas due to flooding

Posted: Updated:
Storm damage in Pittsburg, KS (Pittsburg Morning Sun) Storm damage in Pittsburg, KS (Pittsburg Morning Sun)
NEW CAMBRIA, Kan. (AP) -

The Latest on severe weather in the central United States (all times local):

7:25 a.m.

Much of Kansas remains under flood warnings or watches as heavy rains are expected to push streams and rivers out of their banks.

The National Weather Service says more than 3.5 inches of rain fell onto already-saturated ground in parts of Kansas Monday and overnight, and more is expected Tuesday.

More storms and flooding for KAKEland

New Cambria, a central Kansas town near Salina, asked residents on Monday to voluntarily evacuate for up to 48 hours. Officials say Saline County faces the potential for record flooding along Mulberry Creek near Salina and Smoky Hill River near New Cambria.

Pittsburg officials say an apparent tornado touched down south of the city Monday afternoon, damaging outbuildings and knocking down power lines and trees. Roof damage was also reported to Grubbs Hall at Pittsburg State University. No injuries were reported.

Heavy rains delaying work across Wichita

6:45 a.m.

The National Weather Service says a confirmed tornado has been spotted near the Tulsa International Airport.

A tornado warning was issued early Tuesday morning for the area. Forecasters say the tornado is moving to the northeast at about 50 mph (80 kph).

The tornado comes as part of a powerful storm system that spawned dozens of tornado sightings Monday and caused significant flash flooding in parts of Oklahoma. The stormy weather is expected to continue Tuesday in eastern Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri and western Illinois.

6:15 a.m.

A powerful storm system that spawned dozens of tornado sightings is now causing significant flash flooding in parts of Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation shut down Interstate 40 in El Reno, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) west of Oklahoma City, because of high water Tuesday morning. The National Weather Service says up to 5 inches of rain has fallen since Monday.

In Stillwater, emergency responders were rescuing people from their homes because of high water.

The Storm Prediction Center had warned of an unusually high risk for severe weather Monday for parts of Oklahoma and Texas. Damage was reported in many areas, including the town of Mangum, but no deaths have been reported.

Forecasters say more stormy weather is expected Tuesday, especially in Arkansas, Missouri and western Illinois.