Special delivery, with love, from the Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office

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The last $4.76 a Wichita man had the day after Deputy Robert Kunze died that he decided to donate to a fund for the deputy's family. The last $4.76 a Wichita man had the day after Deputy Robert Kunze died that he decided to donate to a fund for the deputy's family.
First responders from Sedgwick and Harvey Counties Wednesday, Dec 12, 2018, packing boxes with food for families in need this holiday season. First responders from Sedgwick and Harvey Counties Wednesday, Dec 12, 2018, packing boxes with food for families in need this holiday season.
Loading pallets full of Christmas food boxes onto trucks for delivery in Sedgwick and Harvey Counties Wednesday, December 12, 2018. Loading pallets full of Christmas food boxes onto trucks for delivery in Sedgwick and Harvey Counties Wednesday, December 12, 2018.
First responders lined up to take a group picture after they finished packing more than 700 boxes of food for families in need in Sedgwick and Harvey Counties Wednesday morning, December 12, 2018. First responders lined up to take a group picture after they finished packing more than 700 boxes of food for families in need in Sedgwick and Harvey Counties Wednesday morning, December 12, 2018.
Deputies Aaron Miller and Jaime Kleman delivering boxes to the man they say give the biggest donation to the Kunze family after Deputy Robert Kunze died in the line of duty in September.  His donation totaled $4.76. Deputies Aaron Miller and Jaime Kleman delivering boxes to the man they say give the biggest donation to the Kunze family after Deputy Robert Kunze died in the line of duty in September. His donation totaled $4.76.
WICHITA, Kan. (KAKE) -

Around a hundred first responders from two different counties gathered in the Dillon's warehouse west of Goddard Wednesday morning to pack up boxes of food for 500 families in Sedgwick County and 275 families in Harvey County.  For many this is an annual tradition. 

"I've done the food boxes for... at least seven years now," said Jaime Kleman, an administrative assistant in the Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office.

"I've done about four," said Sedgwick County Deputy Aaron Miller.

Every year the sheriffs' offices deliver hundreds of boxes of food to those who need a little extra over the holiday.  But, this year, one delivery in Sedgwick County is extra special.

"I haven't seen him since September 17th, so we're not sure if this is even a correct address," Kleman said.

Kleman and Miller are on a manhunt for a man who made a real impression on them on one of their worst days, the day after Deputy Robert Kunze died in the line of duty.

"He said, 'I don't have much to give, but I want to give you this,'" Kleman said, describing one of the first donations that rolled into help the Kunze family that day, and one of the smallest.  "(He) held his hand toward me and I cupped my hand and he put a handful of change in it.  He said, 'This is all I have to give, but I want you guys to know that I support you.'"

That change totaled just $4.76.

"It still gives me chills," Kleman said about that donation.

In the months since, she says that  handful of change has weighed much heavier than some of the bigger donations that came in during the days that followed.

"He probably couldn't afford to give us that. Maybe that might have been his only money that he had and, you know, he decided he wanted to donate that to the Kunze family instead of maybe eating for the night," Kleman speculated as she and Miller drove toward the address where they hoped to find their benefactor.

They want to make sure he knows he's as important to them as the Kunze family was to him back in September.

"He said, 'My name's not important.' I said, 'To us, your name is important,'" Kleman said.

Finding him wasn't as easy as showing up at an apartment in South Wichita.  No one answered their knocks.  The complex's office was closed.  No one answered the phone number they had for him. 

But, then, the complex manager showed up and said he'd be back later in the afternoon, after work.  He usually stopped by to check in on her, often bringing her a supper of tacos or pizza.  She promised to call the deputies when he arrived.

"I'm nervous," Kleman said about the idea of seeing him again.  "I don't know...I just hope I can keep it together and not cry."

An hour and a half later, the call came in.  Grabbing their boxes of food out of the trunk, Kleman and Miller walked into the office.  He was sitting in front of a desk, chatting with the complex manager.

"Hello," Kleman smiled.

Moments later, he was in tears, swearing this was the last thing he wanted.  He just wanted to show the Kunze family people cared in their hour of grief. 

"I pray for them every night," he said through tears.

 At his request, we didn't show his face or use his name in this story, on-air or online.  

"Like I said, I did this without (wanting) no kind of recognition.  Just like she said," he explained pointing at Kleman.  "And that's the way I want it to remain."

"Even the smallest gift is the biggest thing," Kleman smiled as she thought back to his gift in September.