School officers, teachers respond to Trump's proposal to arm teachers

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Goddard high school now has special intruder locks equipped on all of its doors.

These locks are one of many resources the district has implemented to keep students safe.

"Our teachers don't have to go out in the hallways to look their doors. Now all they have to do is push," said Goddard school resource officer, Carrie Phelps.

On most days you'll also see school officer Phelps roaming the halls. We asked her what her thoughts were on the school resource officer who did nothing during last week’s mass shooting at a Florida high school and she said,, “I think my training would probably take over at the point in time. You go to the gunfire, find the gunfire. I would address the threat."

While the district feels confident in its safety measures, President Donald Trump insists arming teachers and giving incentives to teachers who get gun training.

At a listening session with high school shooting survivors and students at the White House on Wednesday, President Donald Trump said concealed carrying “only works when you have people adept at using firearms.” In a tweet, Trump wrote, “Highly trained, gun adept, teachers/coaches would solve the problem instantly, before police arrive.”

Goddard School District Police Chief Ronney Lieurance says trump's proposal has flaws. "it's very, very difficult to train a staff of teachers in a short amount of time and give them the skills to make sure they would be effective."

Not only that those weapons could get easily get into the wrong hands. Plus, this adds more pressure on teachers.

Lieurance said, "this would just add one more thing to their plate. And it's not just a one and done training. Officers are always training all the time."

Goddard parent Jennifer Barber doesn't want guns in classrooms, "personally I can't imagine why teachers in Goddard would want to be armed. I feel like they have enough responsibility as it is to teach the children."

As for crisis drills, President Trump called them tough and negative for kids. But the Goddard School District stands by doing regular drills.

Lieurance said, "but since Sandy Hook things have changed tremendously. Now with Florida, unfortunately, crisis drills are a necessary evil in school settings."

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