"Smart" thermometers tracking flu in Kansas

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HAYSVILLE Kan. (KAKE) -

According to a tech company, the sickest state in the country is Missouri, but Kansas isn't far behind.

This data comes from the Kinsa Smart Thermometer. The thermometers track health information across the US and a local school district is catching on. The smart thermometer is tracking the flu like never before in real-time.

Kinsa founder and CEO, Inder Singh, told KAKE News when paired with it's app, the thermometer helps track illness trends in neighborhoods, school districts, cities and states.

"You can store your temperature history, add symptoms," Singh said.

The goal is to give you a better idea of what illnesses are spreading where you live, so you know how to respond and so public health officials can prevent an outbreak from getting worse.

"If you know that it's the common cold going around, you're probably not going to go to the local doctor right away. However, if you knew that it was strep throat going around you're going to go out to a doctor right away and try to get the strep test and antibiotics," Singh said.

Singh says more than one million people are using the smart thermometers, which you can buy at most stores for less than $15. The company gets 25,000 temperature readings each day.

In Kansas, five percent of the state is suffering from flu-like symptoms. That's much higher than the national average of 3.7 %. Our neighbor, Missouri, captured the title of the sickest state in America with 5.2 %. In Wichita, it shows 4.9% of people are under the weather. 

Thanks to a grant with Clorox, parents with children at four of Haysville school district's elementary schools are getting the smart thermometers for free. It's part of Kinsa's FLUency program.

The district says it will help it track health trends so it can alert parents about what kids are coming down with.

"I think it's a really good idea so they can track what's going on and try to keep the kids healthier so they know what to do," parent, Jessica Newman said.

The app doesn't track your personal identity, only how you're feeling and your temperature reading.
 

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